haleybakescakes:

‘AWWWWWWWW.

haleybakescakes:

‘AWWWWWWWW.

(via edencourtney)

ilovegem:

(via raspberysundae)
ilovegem:

Reasons why I love Rauschenberg
1. The fluidity and confusion agrees with the way I think.
2. The textural inconsistencies get me excited.
3. Thinking about how the elements relate/repel one another formally and also ideologically. 
4. Can’t you see? The madness is just fucking beautiful. 

fuck yeah

ilovegem:

Reasons why I love Rauschenberg

1. The fluidity and confusion agrees with the way I think.

2. The textural inconsistencies get me excited.

3. Thinking about how the elements relate/repel one another formally and also ideologically. 

4. Can’t you see? The madness is just fucking beautiful. 

fuck yeah

Newquay

Newquay

Well, the telling of jokes is an art of its own, and it always rises from some emotional threat. The best jokes are dangerous, and dangerous because they are in some way truthful.

Kurt Vonnegut (via #johannal) (via quote-book) (via aairborne)
aairborne:

(via gatekeeper)

Andy Horst's Blog: Stuff White People Like

#42 Sushi January 30, 2008 by clander Regardless

Regardless if you are vegetarian, vegan, or just guilty about eating meat, all white people love Sushi. To them, it’s everything they want: foreign culture, expensive, healthy, and hated by the ‘uneducated.’ But there are different levels of…

bloodisthenewblackk:

(via herecomesthefear)
Sakshi Gupta
Untitled (Xerox Machine)
2008Metal
92 x 150 x 60 cm
(via Saatchi)

Reclaiming the wreckage of an old dilapidated Xerox machine that appears to have been used to the point of its extinction, artist Sakshi Gupta appears to have prized the shell apart as though a forensic scientist, looking over the anatomical organs under the natural light of the operating theatre. The work redefines uselessness as useful; stripped of its conventional productive function, the work alludes to the impact or consequences of what, in life, is otherwise hidden from sight. Elevating the machinery off the ground and positioning its integral parts side by side, Gupta manages very resourcefully to deliver something quite beautiful back. This recent work demonstrates Gupta’s ability to scrutinize reality for opportunities for creativity, even where death and decay appear much more prevalent.

Sakshi Gupta

Untitled (Xerox Machine)

2008
Metal

92 x 150 x 60 cm

(via Saatchi)

Reclaiming the wreckage of an old dilapidated Xerox machine that appears to have been used to the point of its extinction, artist Sakshi Gupta appears to have prized the shell apart as though a forensic scientist, looking over the anatomical organs under the natural light of the operating theatre. The work redefines uselessness as useful; stripped of its conventional productive function, the work alludes to the impact or consequences of what, in life, is otherwise hidden from sight. Elevating the machinery off the ground and positioning its integral parts side by side, Gupta manages very resourcefully to deliver something quite beautiful back. This recent work demonstrates Gupta’s ability to scrutinize reality for opportunities for creativity, even where death and decay appear much more prevalent.

Probir Gupta
Rats And Generals In A Zoological Park
2007Acrylic and oxides on canvas
Overall size: 229 x 488 cm
(via Saatchi)

Probir Gupta

Rats And Generals In A Zoological Park

2007
Acrylic and oxides on canvas

Overall size: 229 x 488 cm

(via Saatchi)

Tushar Joag
The Enlightening Army Of The Empire
2008Installation comprising 16 figures, perspex, plastic, brass, mild steel, wood, electric bulbs, wire and mixed media
Figure size: approximately 183 x 49 x 61 cm
(via Saatchi)

Tushar Joag

The Enlightening Army Of The Empire

2008
Installation comprising 16 figures, perspex, plastic, brass, mild steel, wood, electric bulbs, wire and mixed media

Figure size: approximately 183 x 49 x 61 cm

(via Saatchi)

Huma Bhabha
Museum Without Walls
2005Clay, wire, wood, styrofoam
89 x 63.5 x 86.4 cm
(via Saatchi)

Huma Bhabha

Museum Without Walls

2005
Clay, wire, wood, styrofoam

89 x 63.5 x 86.4 cm

(via Saatchi)

(via bloodisthenewblackk)
aairborne:

(via tigerlilylily)